How to Utilize Social Media in Your Recruiting Process

How to Utilize Social Media in Your Recruiting Process How to Utilize Social Media in Your Recruiting Process

has started to overtake the recruiting world. People are posting their offers, official visits, and much more on their , Instagram, and Snapchat. There are some unwritten rules that are very important to consider when deciding whether or not to post something on social media. In this article, I will talk about those guidelines.

Differences Between Sports

One important thing to consider when posting on social media is the sport you are being recruited for. There are differences in what is acceptable and what is not acceptable in terms of the sport you play. For example, if you are a high-level football or basketball recruit, it is totally acceptable to post an offer or “Top 5 School List” on your Twitter. However, if you are a high-level baseball recruit, posting something like this is looked down upon. Look at the social media profiles of athletes in your sport who have already committed and see how they have gone about posting on their accounts.

Using Social Media as a Tool

There are several ways in which you can use social media to your advantage as a prospective student-athlete. 

  • In my opinion, Twitter is the best platform to promote yourself as an athlete. Most college coaches are very active on Twitter. I know this to be true in the baseball world. I had coaches reach out to me on Twitter several times during my recruiting process. 
  • On Twitter, I would recommend putting your height, weight (if applicable to your sport), position(s) or event(s), GPA, and class year in your bio. 
  • I would also link any external sources/websites that might have your stats, metrics, or highlights. For example, you could link your HUDL account or your Perfect Game Account. 
  • After mastering the bio, I would focus on posting stats, updates from tournaments or events, and playing schedules. Design your entire Twitter around your recruiting process. Make sure the coaches who view your profile know where and when you will be playing, how you have been performing, and how you are doing in the classroom. 

Commitment Posts

It is commonplace to see commitment posts on the social media accounts of athletes who have already decided on a college. Doing this allows you to signal to coaches that your recruiting is temporarily over and that you have solidified your college. When posting a commitment, make sure to thank all those who have helped you throughout the process. Also, make sure to thank the coaches at the university you will be playing for. Then, simply announce that you have verbally committed to your respective college.  

Don'ts

There are some things you should absolutely never post on social media. Some of these things go without saying, but I want to mention them anyway. 

You should never post:

  • You doing anything illegal
  • Anything with drugs or alcohol
  • Anything negative about another college
  • Crude language

Posting something along these lines will certainly reduce your chances of earning a college scholarship. Just like colleges don't want an off-the-field risk, they also do not want a social media risk.

10 Black Friday Shopping Ideas For Student-Athletes
What Are You Most Looking Forward to Over Thanksgiving Break?
Related Posts
How to Utilize Social Media in Your Recruiting Process
#recruiting
Tweet it or Delete it? How to Leverage Your Twitter Account for Recruiting
How to Utilize Social Media in Your Recruiting Process
football
Salisbury Football Coach Sherman Wood Offers Recruiting Advice
How to Utilize Social Media in Your Recruiting Process
HUMP DAY POLL!
How Did You Primarily Communicate With College Coaches During Your Recruiting Process?
How to Utilize Social Media in Your Recruiting Process
Don't Be a Victim!
The Reality of Hazing in College Sports: What College Athletes Need to Know
How to Utilize Social Media in Your Recruiting Process
Kick it!
Athlete Feature: Penn State Kicker/Punter Jordan Stout (#1 in the Big Ten and #7 in The Nation For Touchback Percentage)

Take the Poll

Which Legendary College Basketball Coach Would You Most Want to Play For?
Which Legendary College Basketball Coach Would You Most Want to Play For?