4 Tips For Student-Athletes Going Through the Job Search

4 Tips For Student-Athletes Going Through the Job Search 4 Tips For Student-Athletes Going Through the Job Search

What do you want to do after sports? Ahh…this is a question that you always get as a college athlete. The job search question can be scary and bring up some unknowns that you haven’t lent a lot of thought to. A lot of college athletes put their entire identity into their sport and the success or failure that comes along with it. However, it is important to explore other career options in college so that you have opportunities after you graduate.

1. Networking

One of the greatest aspects of college is the networking possibilities that are present! Get connected in your university by attending clubs, meeting friends in class, and getting involved in your specific college. For example, I am studying business at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. I try to connect with my peers in class by introducing myself and following them on various social media platforms. Make close friends with people in your college, especially if you are studying business. You might meet your future business partner in class!

A real benefit to being a student-athlete is that you have such a strong alumni network at the palm of your hands. Take advantage of this by reaching out to former athletes who have a job you might be interested in or talk to your coach to see if they know of any alumni who you could talk to. 

2. LinkedIn and Handshake

Create a LinkedIn and Handshake account. LinkedIn is a social media platform for professionals and people in the workspace. It is also an online job/recruiting board. When you establish your account, start to connect with people in your college. Like and comment on their posts. Start to view and read more about internships in your local area. If you feel confident about your schedule, apply for an internship. Remote internships (like the one I am currently in) are great opportunities for busy college athletes. 

3. Summer/Winter Opportunities

Use your downtime in the summer/winter to pursue internships or job opportunities. Building your resume during this time is extremely valuable. These internships can be short gigs; they do not need to be overly lengthy. Browse job boards on platforms such as LinkedIn to find these internships. 

4. The Benefits of Being a College Athlete

College athletes have it easy in terms of marketing themselves to potential employers. Potential employers LOVE college athletes because they possess the key characteristics of discipline, punctuality, and perseverance. They also know that these athletes are organized and motivated to accomplish team goals. When crafting your resume, make sure to include all of your ventures as a student-athlete. Include the athletic and academic accomplishments you achieved as well as the skills you learned as a student-athlete.

Go out and network! Develop a personality that goes beyond what you do on the field. Connect with professionals in your area and start to develop relationships. These steps can make the job search much easier for you as a student-athlete.

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