Brains and Brawn: 3 Academic Attributes Recruits Should Consider When Choosing a School

Brains and Brawn: 3 Academic Attributes Recruits Should Consider When Choosing a School Brains and Brawn: 3 Academic Attributes Recruits Should Consider When Choosing a School

When getting recruited, it is easy to fall into how much a coach is interested in you and forget that unless you are planning on going pro, the academic part of going to college is the most important. The recruiting process allows you to get lost in how good the team is, the conference they are in, the coaching staff, and if you fit into the team atmosphere. 

Here are some attributes to look for in a school that fits not only your athletic needs, but also fits you as a student and can help you excel in the classroom.

1. Rigor

It is extremely important to know the type of school you are looking at–how intense the classes are going to be, how competitive the student body is, and the type of workload you are going to have are things you have to take into account. Of course, this all depends on the type of major you go into, but every school has a different level of academics. You also need to learn about the type of workload you are going to have. It is already difficult to balance your work as a student with your work as an athlete, so you need to know yourself and what you think you can manage.

Related: The Importance of Location When Choosing a School

2. Class Sizes

If you think you are the type of person to excel in a classroom with a small class size and a close student to professor ratio, then you should look into the type of school that you are getting recruited to. Typically, the smaller the school, the closer the student to professor ratio will be. However, it also depends on the major you go into and how popular that major is at the school. The giant lecture halls with hundreds of people are not for everybody. Knowing the way that you learn best as a student is crucial to your process in picking a school that will suit you best in all areas.

Related: Rate your Coaches, Facilities, and Campus Visits

3. Major Options

If you know what you want to major in when you arrive at school, then it seems obvious to make sure that you are going to a school that has your major. However, many incoming students go in undecided without knowing what they want to major in. What should they do?

My best recommendation for students in this position is to broadly know what you might want to study. If it is something in the humanities or arts, make sure the school has a wide range of options you could try out when you get there. If you are more of a science person, make sure they have plenty of options for majors and also options for things like research and other opportunities to help you when you graduate.

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* Originally published on May 4, 2023, by Bella Nevin

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