4 NCAA Eligibility Center Requirements

4 NCAA Eligibility Center Requirements 4 NCAA Eligibility Center Requirements

Every athlete needs to have their eligibility certified by the NCAA Eligibility Center if they want to play college sports in the NCAA. Some of the rules change depending on the level you want to play, so here is everything you need to know when trying to play in the NCAA:

1. Accounts: 

Every athlete needs to create an account to be eligible. The NCAA Eligibility Center has three types of accounts: 

  1. Free Profile Page Account: 

This account is totally free and is perfect for athletes who want to know more about the process and don’t know what level they want to play at yet. 

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  1. Amateur-Only Certification Account:

This certification account is for a very specific group of athletes. International student-athletes who are planning to play a Division III sport or transfers who are enrolling in a Division II or I school should use this account. This account requires a $70 fee.

  1. Academic and Amateurism Certification Account:

This is the most common account that students use. Any athlete who is planning on competing at the Division I or II level, taking an official visit, or signing a National Letter of Intent should make an account. This account costs $100 for US students and $160 for international students. 

2. Core Courses

All student-athletes need to complete a certain amount of credits of core courses to be eligible to play in the NCAA. 

Division I standards:

Athletes need 16 core course credits, including four years of English, three years of math, two years of science (plus a lab), two years of social science, one extra year of English, math, or science, and four years of other approved core courses. 

Athletes also need to maintain at least a 2.3 GPA in their core course classes. 

Division II standards:

Division II athletes need to complete 16 credits of core courses. This includes 3 years of English, 2 years of math, 2 years of science (plus a lab), 2 years of social science, 3 extra years of English, math, or science, and 4 years of other approved core courses. 

Athletes also need to maintain at least a 2.2 GPA in their core courses. 

3. Amateurism Requirements

To certify that you are eligible to play as an amateur in the NCAA, the Eligibility Center will look into the following:

  • Delaying enrollment for organized competition
  • Playing with professional athletes
  • Signing a professional contract
  • Going to tryouts or practices with a professional team
  • Being paid for playing a sport
  • Accepting prize money
  • Getting an agent
  • Using a recruiting service
  • Playing on a Major Junior Hockey team

4. Final Amateurism Certification:

Every student-athlete needs to request a final amateurism certification before the Eligibility Center can process their certification. 

  • If you are enrolling at a Division I or II school in the fall, you can request your final amateurism after April 1st. 
  • If you are enrolling at a DI or DII school in the winter or spring, you can request your final amateurism after October 1st. 
  • For international students enrolling at a DIII school, you can use the same dates above.

You can request your final amateurism certification at eligibilitycenter.org

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